How Can I Overcome The Evil That Is Procrastination?

The easiest way that I’ve found to overcome procrastination is a two step process. And luckily, the process is damn simple, but it is wildly effective.

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  1. Make a plan for what you want to achieve and by when.
  2. Tell someone exactly what you are planning and ask them to ask you about it the next time they see you.

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By following this simple two-step process, you not only know what you must do, but you put yourself under a little pressure. You know that if someone asks you the next day and you haven’t accomplished it, you are going to feel a little guilty.

Setting a goal gives you something to aim for, and it will feel like an achievement when you’re done. Which is great, but it’s only half the job.

The other half is to tell someone because that makes you accountable. It gives you something to be worried about if you don’t get it done.

You’ll get the best progress if you place yourself in a scenario where you have something to win AND something to lose.

If you accomplish what you set out to, you have the gratification of achieving a high-quality result that you ultimately want.

But if you fail to accomplish what you are aiming for, especially due to procrastination, you are accountable. Even if there was nothing riding on it, you feel like you let someone down. Which is a feeling we all want to avoid, and that in itself is a great reason to keep pushing forward.

Find someone who can keep you accountable

This is where a study group can be an incredibly valuable asset in your study arsenal.

If you are part of a small group or team that is in a similar position to you, then each member of the team instantly becomes accountable to one another.

Which means that the team is relying on you, and you won’t want to let them down.

Don’t procrastinate – just be a pro

If you want to take it to the next level, form a study group and distribute a series of questions between the group.

Every member can tackle one question, and the next time you meet, explain the process of your question to the group.

This is a two-fold experience – you have a goal for which you are accountable, and you can further your experience by teaching others. To teach is to learn twice.

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